Tagprinted electronics

Brand new perspectives in packaging print

How products are judged by their many differing attributes will determine the extent to which they build market share on an ongoing basis. Prior to that, however, it will probably be the outside of the pack. Today’s packaging trends are driven by longer supermarket opening hours, continually enhanced print technologies and capabilities and demand to protect brands and increase recognition. A guest article by Des King.

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Printed electronics keep shirts cool – literally

Cranking up the heat or the air conditioner have been common responses to changes in temperature for decades. But what if the microclimate could be controlled at the individual level? What if clothing had the capacity to become automatically thinner or thicker if the surroundings heated up or cooled down? Researchers at UC San Diego are exploring how printed electronics could help achieve this.

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Paper that lights up your day

Printed paper products have may advantages but in terms of interactivity and responsiveness, they haven’t earned top honors. This is about to change: Thanks to breakthroughs in conductive ink and printing processes, paper has become a more interactive and exciting medium. The newest invention: Paper Pulse, a software that turns ordinary sheets of paper into interactive devices using a simple design process.

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A book that speaks volumes

A picture is worth a thousand words – but how about pictures that actually speak to you and tell real stories? The T-book combines high quality printed photographs with embedded printed loud speakers. When a reader turns a page, the loudspeaker turns on and tells a story, providing rich and engaging background information about the image’s origin and meaning.

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Interactive print display delights visitors

Experimental, innovative, playful and surprising – these attributes are probably high on the wish list of every advertiser. One company that has definitely earned them for its newest display is the London-based agency Dalziel and Pow. They created a large interactive board that told stories with sounds and sights when touched using conductive inks.

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Nanotube inks are inching closer to real-world applications

Nanotube inks have captured the imagination of inventors and scientists worldwide. For years, researchers have been working on methods and materials that turn nanotube inks from lab projects into viable ingredients used in printed circuitry. Now Chinese scientists from Tsinghua University in Beijing have developed a method to draw nanotube fibers with a pen.

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