What is better for the environment? Print or digital communication?
Should you go for print or pixels when distributing a document in your company? Both are viable options and both have an environmental footprint. An interesting and engaging decision tree now helps you to decide whether to push the print button. Based on a paper that studied dozens of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of both print and electronic communications, the decision tree provides facts on the environmental costs and offers suggestions for many common situations.
More at The Guardian

Smart labels to reduce food waste
Transporting fresh fruit and produce is often a challenge. Insignia Technologies, based in Scotland, just presented a solution that can solve the problem of stock rotation and indicate how fresh the transported food really is. From the moment the smart label is stuck to a box or pallet of fresh produce, it starts to change color over a pre-calibrated period of time. The label is also temperature sensitive and has the potential to show any problems of temperature abuse the produce may have experienced.
More at Packaging Europe

Artist uses 3D printed figures to create film
There are many uses for 3D printing, but filmmaking is certainly one of the less obvious. Berlin-based French artist Julien Maire has used translucent 3D printed figures for his latest work, Relief, created during a residency program at Brussels.
More at CNET

WebsiteBox introduces new print marketing tool for realtors
Realtors rely to a large extend on glossy brochures and flyers to present new real estate investments to their clients. To simplify the production of marketing materials, the start-up WebsiteBox has launched PrintsApp. Real estate agents can use the app to create business cards, newsletters, flyers, postcards, letterheads, property sheets, and other materials in three steps.
More at Digital Journal

TetraPak launches packaging made entirely from plants
Sugar cane and wood are the main ingredients for the new packaging just presented by TretraPak. The new Tetra Rex carton will be the first in the market to have bio-based low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films and bio-based high-density polyethylene (HDPE) caps, both derived from sugar cane, in addition to Forest Stewardship Council-certified paperboard. The carton will be commercially available in early 2015.
More at Packaging Europe

Printing company sells images printed on pasta
While big food companies such as Nestlé are working on edible inks, a U.S. start-up has developed a process to print photos, images, and text on edible pasta. The images are supposed to outlast a cooking time of 13-15 minutes and will still be visible once the pasta is served. The founder says her degree in chemistry was of tremendous help in creating this process.
More at MLive