Tag#PrintingProcesses

„Graphy“ From South Korea Prints 3D-Printed Alignment Aid With Shape Memory

There is hardly an industry or sector that is not supported by 3D printing technology. Graphy recently launched what is claimed to be the "world's first" directly 3D-printed orthodontic splint with shape memory function at a show in Cologne, Germany. The manufacturer from South Korea works respectively prints with photopolymer resins. The new product makes it possible to speed up the treatment process for patients. It could make replacement aligners largely obsolete.

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Our Highlights From the drupa Blog 2021

The year 2021 is coming to an end and looking back, a lot has happened. We have been able to experience many events and topics and kept hold of them in our drupa blog, and we would like to thank all our readers. From virtual.drupa to sustainability and 3D printing to printing processes, we have covered a wide variety of areas and would like to share some of our highlights with you before 2022 arrives and we start looking into the future to what lies ahead.

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#PrintingProcesses: Large Format Digital Printing & OOH

It is time for our latest #PrintingProcesses article, where we share fundamental insights regarding printing technologies and methods. In this episode of our series, we will continue from our last article, in which we had already teased what’s to come: large format digital printing and out of home media.

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#PrintingProcesses: Digital Inkjet Printing

Printing Processes

It’s time for a new article in our series #PrintingProcesses, in which we introduce you to all the basic – yet very important – techniques and fundamental knowledge of the print technologies we know and utilise to this day. This episode, it’s all about digital inkjet printing which belongs to the Non-Impact Printing (NIP) technology.

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#PrintingProcesses: Photocopying

Printing Processes

In this new episode of our freshly startet series #PrintingProcesses, we take a closer look at photocopying, also known as xerography. This invention enabled the possibility to make copies of documents and other visual images onto paper or plastic film quick and especially cheap. And even still today, in the era of digitalization, photocopiers are an indispensable part of everyday life.

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#PrintingProcesses: Screen Printing

Printing Processes

After we took a closer look at gravure printing, one of the oldest printing processes still in use today, in this edition of #PrintingProcesses we take you into the world of screen printing. Historically, it’s considered the fourth printing process and is also called stencil printing. If you combine screen printing with suitable ink, you can print on almost any flat material, such as textiles, glass, ceramics, paper and even stone.

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#PrintingProcesses: Gravure Printing

Printing Processes

Let’s move on with our new series #PrintingProcesses and one of the oldest printing processes still in use today: gravure printing. As early as the Middle Ages, people produced copperplate engravings (a graphic gravure printing process) with an image depicted in the recesses. Since then, gravure printing has developed over a long time and is used today for banknotes, cosmetics packaging, magazines and many more.

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#PrintingProcesses: Flat Printing

Printing Processes

For the second installment of our new #PrintingProcesses series, we’re focusing our attention on flat printing, also known as Lithography. Developed in Munich, Germany, by a penniless playwright, it offered a cheap and efficient printing method that quickly gained popularity all over Europe.

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#PrintingProcesses: Relief Printing

Printing Processes

We are starting our new series #PrintingProcesses with the original, first-ever printing process: Relief Printing. With this technique you cut an inverted version of your intended print into a plank of wood, linoleum or metal plates, apply the ink onto the plate and press it down on paper to create the image, like a stamp.

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